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A-Z of Aviation Abbreviations


The aviation industry is full of abbreviations. Here are just some of them! How many did you already know?

Abbreviation
Definition
A/C
Aircraft
B/C
Business Class
CCOM
Cabin Crew Operating Manual
DFDRS
Digital Flight Data Recorder System
EASA
European Aviation Safety Agency
FAA
Federal Aviation Administration
GHS
Ground Handling/Servicing
HMI
Human Machine Interface
IATA
International Air Transport Association
JAA
Joint Aviation Authorities
KPI
Key Performance Indicator
L/G
Landing gear
MOE
Maintenance Organisation Exposition
NEO
New Engine Option
OAT
Outside Air Temperature
PF
Pilot Flying
QRH
Quick Reference Handbook
RTO
Rejected Take-Off
SOI
Standard Operating Instructions
TCAS
Traffic Collision Avoidance System
U/S
Unserviceable
VFR
Visual Flight Rules
WBM
Weight and Balance Manual
XNG
Crossing
Y/C
Yankee Class (tourist class)
ZSA
Zonal Safety Analysis


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